A-Level Latin

OCR Latin A-Level  H443
 
Every year, a good number of candidates take up Latin from within and from without the school. The calibre of the Latin students is extremely high with most years achieving 100% ‘A’ pass rate. Most years the Latinists, though not necessarily, also go onto read Classics or Classical related subjects at the very best universities in the country. All candidates will be expected to study two set texts, one prose and one verse. Essentially students will study two to three authors, for instance Cicero, Tacitus and Virgil. Additionally they read some of both of the authors in translation. Latin in the Sixth Form is seriously enjoyable as it is throughout the School because of the fascinating content of the texts and enjoyably opportunity of learning to write Latin.
 
The most able are encouraged to attend the Bryanston Ancient Greek Summer School. Greek GCSE and A-Level is available upon request.
 
If a student has attended a school which offers GCSE Latin, it is required that he or she will have taken the subject and will have achieved a Grade 7 or above. Students will confirm whether they will be sitting AS or continuing to A-Level in the first half of Year 12.
 
Overview.
 
Learners must take all components: 01, 02, 03 and 04 to be awarded the OCR A-Level in Latin. Learners build their knowledge of vocabulary and linguistic structures through reading and studying prose and verse texts in Latin.
 
01. Unseen paper of 1hour 45 mins.
 
Unseen Translation is an externally assessed, written examination testing AO1. It is worth 100 marks, which is 33% of the total marks for the A level. There are two sections to this component. Learners answer both sections. In Section A, learners will translate an unseen passage of Latin prose into English. This section is worth 50 marks. In Section B, learners will translate an unseen passage of Latin verse into English. Learners will also be required to scan two lines of verse. This section is worth 50 marks.
 
02. Comprehension Paper or Prose composition of 1hour 15 mins.
 
Prose Composition or Comprehension is an externally assessed, written examination testing AO1. It is worth 50 marks, which is 17% of the total marks for the A level. There are two sections to this component. Learners answer either Section A or Section B. In Section A, learners will answer translation, comprehension and grammar questions on an unseen passage of Latin prose. This section is worth 50 marks. In Section B, learners will translate a passage, of at least 100 words in length, into Latin. This section is worth 50 marks.
 
03. Prose author.  Two hours. There will be two authors from whom to select.
 
Prose Literature is an externally assessed, written examination testing AO2 and AO3. It is worth 75 marks, which is 25% of the total marks for the A level. There are three sections to this component. In Section A, learners will answer questions to show their understanding and appreciation of the set text studied from Group 1. In Section B, learners will answer questions to show their understanding and appreciation of the set text studied from Group 2. Thy will have to translate a passage of the set text into English, answer comprehension questions and answer a 15-mark question analysing literary style, characterisation, argument and literary meaning. In Section C, learners will write an essay which draws upon material from the Group 2 set text and the material read in translation. 
 
04. Verse author. Two hours. There will be two authors from whom to select.
 
Literature (Component 04) Verse Literature is an externally assessed, written examination testing AO2 and AO3. It is worth 75 marks, which is 25% of the total marks for the A level. There are three sections to this component. In Section A, learners will answer questions to show their understanding and appreciation of the set text studied from Group 3. In Section B, learners will answer questions to show their understanding and appreciation of the set text studied from Group 4. In both Section A and Section B, learners will have to translate a passage of the set text into English, answer comprehension questions and answer a 15-mark question analysing literary style, characterisation, argument and literary meaning. In Section C, learners will write an essay which draws upon material from the Group 4 set text and the material read in translation.
 
Content of Prose Literature (H443/03)       
 
Cicero, Philippic II (AS-Level)
 
Apuleius, Metamorphoses (Cupid and Psyche) (A-Level)
 
Content of Verse Literature (H443/04)
 
Virgil, Aeneid XI (AS and A-Level)
 
Modus Operandi for all prose and verse set texts.
 
Learners should be able to: 
  • demonstrate detailed knowledge and understanding of the prose and verse set texts studied, including metre.
  • understand and appreciate the literary context from which the set texts have been taken by reading an appropriate selection of ancient literature in English translation
  • understand and appreciate, as appropriate, the social, cultural and historical contexts for the set texts, their authors and audiences
  • identify, analyse and evaluate literary techniques, characterisation, strength of argument and literary meaning in the set texts
  • use appropriate technical terms in English to describe the literary techniques and features of the set texts
  • demonstrate appropriate historical and/or cultural knowledge when necessary for the understanding or evaluation of a given phrase, sentence or passage
  • appropriately select relevant information from the material studied to support their argument and analyse and summarise their findings
  • present relevant information in a clear, concise and coherent manner whilst writing at length, using appropriate terminology in English.
  • understand and respond to passage(s) from a set text
  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the wider context of a set text
  • translate passages of each set text into English
  • critically analyse the literary style, characterisation, argument and literary meaning of a passage from a set text
  • write at length drawing upon a study of a set text as well as material studied in translation.
Enrichment.
 
Visit in Activity Week Two to Greece.
 
Many candidates also take up the opportunity to study Greek at this stage and are encouraged to attend the Bryanston Ancient Greek Summer School.
 
Associated Careers.
A Classics Degree is regarded by employers as an illustration of an ability to think logically and coherently; it therefore, in combination with suitable work experience and specialist training from the employer, opens doors to a variety of careers from accountancy and consultancy to the diplomatic corps, civil service, Foreign Office, the law and computer programming.
 
Classical Civilisation
 
Students wishing to study this course must obtain at least a Grade 7 in GCSE English. A Grade 7 or above in another Humanity (e.g. History) is also preferred. Students will confirm whether they will be sitting AS or continuing to A-Level in the first half of Year 12. 
 
AS-Level Classical Civilisation
 
Candidates study two papers.
 
1. The World of the Hero - Greek Epic Poetry, Homer’s Odyssey. 
 
2. Greek Theatre. Sophokles’ Oedipus the King and Euripides’ Bacchae, Aristophanes’ The Frogs. A selection of ancient
Greek vases are also studied as archaeological sources for the theatre.
 
Both papers are worth 65 marks and are 90 minutes in length.
 
A-Level Classical Civilisation
 
Candidates study three papers.
 
1. Homer’s Odyssey and Virgil’s Aeneid. 100 marks. 140 minutes long.
2. Greek Theatre (as above). 75marks. 105 minutes long.
3. Democracy and the Athenians. 75 marks. 105 minutes long.
 
ENRICHMENT
Visit to Classical sites in The Mediterranean Basin during Activity Week Two.
 
ASSOCIATED CAREERS
A Classics Degree is regarded by employers as an illustration of an ability to think logically and coherently; it therefore, in combination with suitable work experience and specialist training from the employer opens doors to a variety of careers from accountancy and consultancy to the diplomatic corps, Foreign Office, civil service and the law.
 
CONTACT DETAILS
 
Mr. Alexander Carroll, Head of Classics

Email: acarroll@saintolaves.net